Dow Jones Component Reshuffle is Bearish for Stocks

The Dow Jones Industrial Average is about to undergo the most significant changes in a decade. The featured chart shows that S&P Dow Jones Indexes usually gets the timing of its changes wrong. Furthermore, the ‘New Dow’ will be subject to the whims of the most vulnerable sector of the US economy.

Good-bye Hewlett-Packard, Bank of America, and Alcoa. Hello Nike, Goldman Sachs, and Visa.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average is undergoing its most dramatic facelift in a decade and will morph into a much more financial sector focused average. The changes will go into effect September 20, 2013.

I see the following risks short and long-term:

Short-term Reshuffling Risks

In recent years reshuffling components was followed by temporary corrections. The weekly DJIA chart below chronicles changes and the effect on the Dow since February 2008 (there was no change from November 2005 – February 2008).

The short-term performance immediately following the shuffle was generally negative, although the losses were limited. Long-term was in line with random.

Long-term Reshuffling Risks

S&P Dow Jones Indexes, a subsidy of McGraw-Hill (which is also the parent company of Standard & Poor’s and J.D. Power and Associates), dropped one financial name (BofA) from the mighty Dow and added two (Goldman Sachs and Visa).

But the exposure to financials is more significant than even the two for one swith suggests. Why?

The Dow Jones (NYSEArca: DIA) is a price-weighted gauge, that’s why it’s called an average not an index. Price-weighted simply means that the stock with the biggest price tag carries the most weight. Currently that’s IBM. At $190 a share IBM accounts for 9.43% of the DJIA and is the unquestioned VIP (Chevron, the ‘runner up,’ trades at $123).

Soon to be deleted Bank of America trades at $14.50 and accounts for 0.74% of the index (keep in mind that the index has only 30 components). That means that BAC would have to move 13 times as much as IBM to match IBM’s effect on the average.

Currently financials are the fifth biggest sector of the DJIA and account for only 11.39%. Here’s where it gets interesting:

Visa trades at $186 and Goldman Sachs at $165. The top three holdings of the Dow Jones will be IBM, Visa and Goldman Sachs. Based on a quick thumbnail assessment, financials will soon be the biggest sub-sector of the Dow with an allocation around 25%.

We shouldn’t forget that the Financial Select Sector SPDR ETF (NYSEArca: XLF) and SPDR S&P Bank ETF (NYSEArca: KBE) lost 85% from 2007 to 2009, significantly underperforming the S&P 500 (NYSEArca: SPY), which was down ‘only’ 57%.

So the heavy financial weighting of the Dow can be a negative.

In fact, former Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson mentioned in a guest contribution for a German finance and economy newspaper that he fears yet another financial ‘firestorm’ (firestorm is the term he used).

According to Paulson the financial sector is quite vulnerable. This article explains in detail the problem Paulson warns of: Hank Paulson Warns of Another Financial Crisis.

Simon Maierhofer is the publisher of the Profit Radar Report.

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Weekly ETF SPY: XLF – Running Into Resistance

Financials are the second most important industry sector of the S&P 500 Index. Right now the Financial Select Sector SPDR ETF (XLF) sports a curious correlation to an economic indicator, along with some directional clues.

Since 2007, the financial sector has tracked consumer sentiment closer than any other sector. The chart below plots the Financial Select Sector SPDR ETF (XLF) against the Thomson/Reuters University of Michigan Consumer Sentiment Index.

Consumers aren’t nearly as confident now as they were in 2007 and the financial sector is far away from its 2007 high.

The comparison between consumer sentiment and XLF is more of anecdotal than predictive value, but the chart of XLF does provide some technical nuggets.

XLF is now trading above Fibonacci resistance at 18.21. This Fibonacci level corresponds to a 38.2% retracement of the points lost from 2007 – 2009.

The move above Fibonacci resistance is bullish and resistance now becomes support.

However, a resistance level made up of several lows reached in 2000, 2002, and 2003 is immediately ahead at 18.52 – 19.66.

Financials, as with the rest of the market, have enjoyed an incredible run, but investors have come to love financials a bit too much.

Current sentiment towards financials is almost the polar opposite to what the Profit Radar Report noted on August 5, 2012:

Financials are currently under loved (who can blame investors). Of the $900 million invested in Rydex sector funds, only $18 million (2%) are allocated to financials. With such negative sentiment a technical breakout (close above 14.90) could cause a quick spike in prices.”

The combination of sentiment extremes and upcoming resistance suggests that some type of correction is not far away. However, the correction may be more on the shallow side. Watch Fibonacci and trend line support for more clues.

Financials at 22-Month High – What Does this Mean for The S&P 500?

Pssst, no one is talking about it, but one industry sector has quietly climbed to new 22-month highs – Financials. Will their run continue, how can you tell when it’s over and how will it affect the stock market?

The financial media can’t see the forest for the trees or the stairs for the cliff.

So much ink is being spilled reporting Obama’s and Boehner’s latest comments, hints and lunch menu, that the media missed the financial sector’s march to new 22-month highs.

Will financials continue to edge higher, and what does the financial sector strength mean for the S&P 500 and other broad market indexes?

The chart below provides a nutshell summary of the Financial Select Sector SPDR ETF (XLF).

1) Marks the technical breakout from a multi-week trading range. The Profit Radar Report expected this breakout on August 5, when it said:

“Financials are currently under loved. Of the $900 million invested in Rydex sector funds, only $18 million (2%) are allocated to financials. With such negative sentiment a technical breakout above 14.90 could cause a quick spike in prices.”

2) Shows that XLF never broke below the bold October 2011 trend line and never triggered a sell signal.

The strength in financials was one reason the Profit Radar Report maintained that the down side of the post September correction was limited and exited all short positions at S&P 1,348 and S&P 1,371 (and went long at S&P 1,424 last week).

3) Volume over the last couple of days has been solid.

4) RSI is lagging the September 14 high water mark and will be running into resistance. RSI may also set up a longer-term bearish divergence if it isn’t able to beat the September high.

XLF accounts for 15.42% of the broad SPDR S&P 500 ETF (SPY) and has the power to be the tail that wags the dog.

This price/RSI divergence in XLF might harmonize with my expectation for a large-scale market top sometime in Q1/Q2 2013.

There’s a newly formed support line (not shown in chart), which should be used as stop-loss for long positions.

No doubt by the time the media moves the spotlight on financials’ performance, the lion’s share of the gains will be already over.

Simon Maierhofer shares his market analysis and points out high probability, low risk buy/sell recommendations via the Profit Radar Report. Click here for a free trial to Simon’s Profit Radar Report.

Big Banks Pity Their Near-Record Profits – Is This Bullish for the Financial Sector?

It’s tough being a banker today. The Federal Reserve wants to buy their bonds for top dollars, profits are near all-time highs, and yet bankers just aren’t happy. Here’s a closer look at the numbers and technicals.

“Mirror, mirror on the wall, who is the richest of them all,” the six big banks ask. The mirror replies: “You are the richest of them all, almost as rich as you were in 2006.” Disappointed about not being the richest ever, the banks walk away to drown their sorrow in a pity party.

The six largest banks reported a combined annual (June 2011 – June 2012) profit of $63 billion. How does this compare to the banks’ all-time record earnings? In 2005 banks earned $68 billion, in 2006 they earned $83 billion.

Banks are depressed because the new regulatory regime crimps their style and proven methods to make money. It requires banks to maintain bigger capital cushions. This limits their appetite for insane leverage and makes it harder to earn an “adequate” return on equity.

Boy, and those low interest rates really make it hard to make money too, they say. Never mind that the Fed pushed down interest rates just to keep the banks alive.

Some of the $63 billion profits (exactly how much nobody knows) aren’t real profits. They are accounting gains, profits engineered by clever accountants. That would explain why the six largest banks announced at least 40,000 job cuts from June 2011 – June 2012.

Perhaps this will give the banks – which are JPMorgan Chase, Wells Fargo, Goldman Sachs, Citigroup, Bank of America, and Morgan Stanley – reason to cheer. According to Bloomberg estimates they are expected to earn in excess of $75 billion in 2013.

Will Financials Rally Further?

The August 5, Profit Radar Report took a closer look at financial sector – the Financial Select Sector SPDR ETF (XLF) in particular – and featured the following research:

“Financials are currently under loved (who can blame investors). Of the $900 million invested in Rydex sector funds, only $18 million (2%) are allocated to financials.

With such negative sentiment, a technical breakout (close above 14.90) could cause a quick spike in prices. Next trend line resistance, and possible target, if 14.90 is overcome, is 15.63.”

As the chart below shows, this technical break out above resistance (dotted red lines) occurred on August 6th. The initial target at 15.63 (outlined by the solid red line) was met and exceeded quickly.

This red line, previously resistance, has now become support. There was no price/RSI divergence at the September 14 high, which suggests at least another run to new highs … another reason to make the bankers happy.

The analysis for the SPDR S&P Bank ETF (KBE) looks nearly identical.

The only way investors can share in the bankers’ (undeserved) joy is to profit from opportunities like this. The mission of the Profit Radar Report is to identify high probability and low-risk buy/sell signals for the S&P 500 and many other asset classes.

Financials – Is the Most Despised U.S. Sector Getting Ready to Rally?

Investors are shunning the financial sector. Although financials account for more than 14% of the S&P 500 (SPY), investors (by one measure) have only 2% of their money invested in financials. Some contrarians take this as a buy signal, is it?

Knight Capital, MF Global, LIBOR fixing scandal, JP Morgan losses, excessive Wall Street bonuses … there seem to be unlimited reasons to dislike the financial sector (Financial Select Sector SPDR ETF – XLF).

When it comes to financials, investors are not only talking the talk, they are walking the walk. Right now financials are the most despised sector in the United States. Of the $900 million invested in Rydex sector funds, only $18 million are allocated to financials, that’s just 2%.

However, the financial sector accounts for 14.21% of the S&P 500 Index (SPY), which makes it the second biggest sector of the S&P (behind technology).

Extreme pessimism often results in unexpected price spikes. Is the financial sector getting ready to rally?

The Technical Take on Financials

Financials appear to be at an important short-term juncture, but let’s provide some long-term context before looking at the short-term.

From the 2009 low to the 2011 high, the financial sector (XLF) jumped from $5.88 to $17.20. Before that, XLF dropped from 38.15 to 5.88. Today XLF trades 61% below its all time high price tag of 38.15. In comparison, the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) is less than 8% away from its all-time high.

Important short-term resistance for XLF last week was at 14.85. This resistance was made up of the July 3 and 27 highs and a trend line that connects the March 27 and May 1 highs.

On August 8, XLF was able to close above 14.85. Such a break out is generally bullish. However, the volume on which XLF broke out was significantly lower than average (see chart below).

Based purely on the chart and sentiment, the bullish message deserves the benefit of the doubt as long as XLF remains above 14.80. But a break below 14.80 would severely ding the immediate up side potential for XLF.

What about the down side risk? Aggressive investors may decide to sell or go short XLF with a break below 14.80. The initial down side target would be around 14.45 – 14.50.