Is Now the Time to Buy Gold and Gold Miners?

Gold was the most hated asset class going into December, especially after Swiss voters rejected a proposal to boost the country’s gold reserves by some 1,500 tons (about 7% of global annual demand). Is this a good ‘blood in the streets’ trade?

Massive. That’s the only way to describe The December 1 overnight reversal of the gold futures (following the Swiss no vote).

In fact, price action painted two giant green candles. One marked the November 7 low, and than there was Sunday’s.

Two trading days before the November 7 low, the Profit Radar Report wrote: “There is a bullish divergence and gold has finally met our long-term down side target. Gold seasonality for November is bullish. Sentiment, seasonality and the bullish technical divergence increase the odds of an upcoming buying opportunity. We will dip our ‘toes in the water’ and buy gold if it dips below 1,130 and moves above 1,140.”

The Profit Radar Report identified the gold trade as one of the biggest opportunities around, and the gold rally was chugging along nicely, until the Swiss gold referendum came along.

Gold futures (chart shown) dropped more than 2% right after Sunday’s (November 30) rejection by Swiss voters. Sunday’s Profit Radar Report was published when futures were down more than 2%, trading near 1,145. It stated:

Swiss voters rejected proposals Sunday to boost gold reserves. Short-term, the Swiss gold proposal was a lose/lose proposition for gold buyers and an unnecessary cross current for our precious metals trade. As Wednesday’s PRR mentioned, soaring prices following a ‘yes’ vote were a forgone conclusion. When everyone expects a rally, the market usually doesn’t deliver one. A ‘no’ vote on the other hand would obviously be bearish.

A quick drop in gold prices was needed to shock the ‘bullish Swiss vote gold bugs.’  The question is how long of a drop? Initial (kneejerk) reactions following such newsworthy events are often wrong. Gold futures are down another 2% on Sunday.

In terms of technical analysis, the most likely interpretation of this decline is a retracement of the rally from the November 7 low. The chart shows various Fibonacci retracement levels (78.6% = 1,146.70). In terms of Elliott Wave Theory, this pullback looks like a wave 2 correction. The only requirement for a wave 2 is that it can’t exceed the prior extreme (November 7 low). In short, as long as the November 7 low remains unbroken, we are looking for higher gold prices.”

The corresponding entry level for the SPDR Gold Shares ETF (NYSEArca: GLD) was at 111.08 on November 11.

Today, gold busted through red trend line resistance. This trend line can now be used as stop-loss.

What about Gold Miners?

Gold miners tend to respond faster and stronger to rising gold prices than bullion itself. In essence, gold miners are a leveraged play on gold prices.

Friday’s kneejerk reaction offered a low-risk entry for the MarketVectors Gold Miners ETF (NYSEArca: GDX).

Sometimes when a trend line is broken, prices will double back and test the line before peeling away in the direction of the break.

The Profit Radar Report suggested a buy limit order against the green trend line to scoop up GDX in case of a pullback. That’s exactly what happened November 28, courtesy of the kneejerk selloff prior to the Swiss vote.

The actual GDX chart does not look as bullish as the gold chart, but GDX is likely to dance to gold’s beat, not vice versa.

The precious metals trade (which includes silver) is likely just in its infancy and should offer a number of good entry points along the way.

Continuous low-risk, high probability trading opportunities and gold analysis is available via the Profit Radar Report.

Simon Maierhofer is the publisher of the Profit Radar Report. The Profit Radar Report presents complex market analysis (S&P 500, Dow Jones, gold, silver, euro and bonds) in an easy format. Technical analysis, sentiment indicators, seasonal patterns and common sense are all wrapped up into two or more easy-to-read weekly updates. All Profit Radar Report recommendations resulted in a 59.51% net gain in 2013.

Follow Simon on Twitter @ iSPYETF to get actionable ETF trade ideas delivered for free.

 

Is this Gold Rally Real or ‘Fool’s Gold?’

A novice wouldn’t be able to distinguish fool’s gold from real gold. Even gold experts have trouble telling the difference. Miners have come up with the acid test to avoid getting fooled.

Most metals tend to bubble or fizzle when they come into contact with acid, precious metals don’t. Placing a small drop of a strong acid, such as nitric acid, onto the metals surface quickly and unmistakable differentiates real gold from fool’s gold.

Is this gold rally the real deal or is it a fool’s gold rally?

The results of this analysis won’t be as conclusive as the acid test for gold (nothing ever is in investing), but there are some worthwhile indicators to consider.

CBOE Gold Volatility Index

The April 28, 2013 Profit Radar Report examined a pattern in the CBOE Gold Volatility Index to ascertain if the April low at 1,321 was here to stay.

The CBOE Gold Volatility Index is basically a VIX for gold as the VIX methodology is applied to options on the SPDR Gold Shares (NYSEArca: GLD).

An update chart of GLD plotted against the Gold VIX is shown below. Major gold lows in 2010 and 2011 occurred against positive gold VIX divergences, where gold prices dropped to a new low, but the Gold VIX didn’t.

Such divergences are nothing new. I’ve used similar divergences between the S&P 500 (SNP: ^GSPC) and the VIX (Chicago Options: ^VIX) to nail major stock market lows in March 2009, October 2011, and June 2012. See S&P500 Forecasting History for more details.

There was no such divergence in April 2013 when gold (NYSEArca: IAU) dropped as low as 1,321. This suggested new lows and the April 23 Profit Radar Report stated that: “A new low would be the best buying opportunity.”

We got that new low on June 28, but it didn’t have all the hallmarks of a lasting bottom. We were long for parts of the rally from the June low, but never committed fully.

Our focus was on the iShares Silver Trust (NYSEArca: SLV) where we just closed out a very nice trade. We went long gold again with Thursday’s move above 1,345 (GLD trigger was 130.15).

The move above 1,345 is bullish, but gold has already reached your initial up side target around 1,365 (see resistance lines in chart below).

If gold can move above resistance here, it is likely to extend its rally and move to our second target. Otherwise watch out.

Gold prices have a huge effect on gold miners (NYSEArca: GDX). One unique valuation metric – which correctly predicted the 2001 and 2008 low for mining stocks – just flashed a rare signal. Read more about the Gold Miner’s Signal here: By One Measure Gold Miners Are as Cheap as Ever.

Simon Maierhofer is the publisher of the Profit Radar Report.

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By One Measure, Gold Miners (GDX) Are as Cheap as Ever

Gold mining is a labor and capital-intensive business. But there are times when investors can make money even in the gold mining sector. That’s either when gold prices soar or when blood is on the streets. Was the June low ‘bloody’ enough to buy gold mining stocks?

Gold mining is a tough business. It is capital intensive to wrestle the yellow metal from the ground. Once mined, gold – the most valuable asset on the company’s balance sheet – is sold.

Sometimes miners are forced to sell their gold for less than it costs to mine. The miners’ fate often depends on the price of gold.

For the novice investor, the price of gold has become unpredictable. During QE1 and QE2, gold (NYSEArca: IAU) and silver (NYSEArca: SLV) soared because investors were afraid of inflation.

During QE3 and QE4 investors were still afraid of inflation, but gold and silver tanked. Same circumstances, different outcome. Go figure. Instead the S&P 500 (SNP: ^GSPC) soared.

Most of the time the gold mining sector is not the best place if you’re looking for return of capital.

But, if you can catch a major bottom (or a gold bull market), even the gold mining sector can pay off big time.

The Market Vectors Gold Miners ETF (NYSEArca: GDX) is up 36% since its June low. Is the suffering over for the bruised mining sector?

This will largely depend on the price of gold (more below), but first let’s take a look at one unique indicator.

The chart below plots the SPDR Gold Shares (NYSEArca: GLD) against the Market Vectors Gold Miners ETF (GDX) and the GDX:GLD ratio.

The GDX:GLD ratio basically measures the price of gold stocks compared to the price of gold. When the ratio is high, miners are expensive relative to gold. When the ratio is low, miners are cheap relative to gold.

As per this measure, gold miners are cheap now and were ‘major bottom worthy’ cheap a couple of months ago.

If you go back further – until 1996, comparing the Gold Bugs Index (NYSEArca: ^HUI) with the price of gold – you will find a lower ratio in 2001, which was when HUI bottomed.

So this particular indicator suggests that a major low for gold miners is in. But what about gold prices, the lifeblood of every mining operation? The article Is The Gold Rally Real or ‘Fool’s Gold?’ takes a detailed look at gold prices.

Simon Maierhofer is the publisher of the Profit Radar Report.

Follow Simon on Twitter @ iSPYETF

 

Weekly ETF SPY: Gold Miners (GDX)

Anytime a stock or ETF drops 50% in a short period of time, it’s tempting to bet on a bounce. Such a bounce may be forthcoming for GDX, but to avoid being cut by the proverbial falling knife, it’s prudent to wait for a move above resistance.

If you think gold’s performance has been disappointing, look at gold miners.That’ll cheer you up (assuming you don’t own gold mining stocks).

The Market Vectors Gold Miners ETF (GDX) tumbled over 50% since its September 2012 all-time high. Is there enough ‘blood in the streets’ to buy GDX?

My March 6 comparison between gold and GDX mercilessly ousted fundamental profit making flaws of the gold mining sector. Today’s article will look at the technical picture. Could the steep decline be a buying opportunity?

After a 50% haircut, trend following technicals are obviously pointing lower and fishing for a bottom here is like catching the proverbial falling knife.

However, based on RSI, the selling intensity is subsiding and GDX has reached the bottom of a trend channel that contained the last leg lower. This could halt or stop the bleeding.

Where the final low will be remains to be seen, but going long with a stop-loss just beneath channel support or after GDX drops below channel support and closes back above would be a low-risk opportunity for aggressive investors looking for a favorable risk/reward trade.

Low-risk doesn’t mean no risk. There is risk, but it’s well defined by the trend channel.

Longer-term, the GDX meltdown provides fertile soil for a buying opportunity. But conservative investors should wait for the ‘seed to sprout’ before buying.

A break above resistance would be the first signal that the green shoot is ready to mature further. GDX resistance is provided by the red lines and black parallel channel.

A move above the trend channel will be more meaningful, but even breaking above red line resistance can be used as a buy trigger with a stop-loss just below the trend line (or parallel channel).

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