The Best Place for Tell Tale Signs: Small Caps?

The S&P 500 inched up a pitiful 0.03% last week. The Russell 2000 rallied 2.33%.

But that’s not the only reason small cap stocks are worth a second look right now.

As the weekly bar chart below shows, the Russell 2000 (NYSEArca: IWM) is bumping against significant double resistance.

The November 29 Profit Radar Report stated that: “Last week’s push higher happened during a holiday week on low volume, and therefore needs confirmation. RSI just barely failed to issue a bullish confirmation.

Small caps enter a bullish 1-month window (of relative outperformance compared to large caps) in mid-December. However, prior to catching this bullish seasonal tailwind, small caps will likely have to digest recent gains.”

This digestive period is now underway. Regardless of the immediate down side risk (which should be limited), the Russell 2000 sports the most pronounced overhead resistance.

A strong move above resistance may be the best tell tale sign of further gains. The Profit Radar Report will monitor the strength of any breakout to assess its longevity.

Simon Maierhofer is the publisher of the Profit Radar ReportThe Profit Radar Report presents complex market analysis (S&P 500, Dow Jones, gold, silver, euro and bonds) in an easy format. Technical analysis, sentiment indicators, seasonal patterns and common sense are all wrapped up into two or more easy-to-read weekly updates. All Profit Radar Report recommendations resulted in a 59.51% net gain in 2013 and 17.59% in 2014.

Follow Simon on Twitter @ iSPYETF

 

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Simon Says: Here is Big Support for Small Cap Stocks

Some say if it’s too obvious, it’s obviously wrong, but when it comes to the Russell 2000 you may ask: How could you have missed this? The media proclaimed the Russell 2000 in a ‘correction’ just before it bounced from key support (three times).

Sometimes the financial media sacrifices accuracy (or neutrality) to deliver the WOW effect.

That’s why we read headlines like this:

“Scary October Start for Stocks; Russell in Correction.”

Perhaps this particular WOW-focused media outlet felt it was close enough to Halloween to paint a 1.32% S&P 500 and 1.54% Russell 2000 drop as ‘scary.’

A correction is often (arbitrarily) defined as a 10% decline. From March to May and once again from July to September, the Russell 2000 lost 10%. A correction? Maybe.

The chart below shows why labeling anything Russell related as ‘scary’ or ‘correction’ was premature.

Every pullback, or ‘correction’ since November 2013 ended at support at 1,080.

I picked on this fear-mongering headline in the October 1 Profit Radar Report and commented that:

“The Russell remains above support around 1,080. I suppose that even novices are able to spot this support level by now, so it probably doesn’t mean as much as it did in February and May. Nevertheless, the odds for some sort of bounce from here are above average.”

Well, I was kind of wrong. 1,080 meant just as much last week as it did the prior three times it was touched.

At some point this support will become too obvious for its own (or investors) good, but one thing is for certain:

Correction or not, bears cannot make any real progress unless the Russell 2000 breaks below 1,080.

The corresponding support level for the iShares Russell 2000 ETF (NYSEArca: IWM) is 107.

Will the Russell 2000 break below 1,080 in October? Sunday’s special Profit Radar Report includes detailed analysis on what new lows would mean for the stock market and whether the market is carving out a major top.

The conclusion is not ‘scary’, but probably surprising for most people.

Simon Maierhofer is the publisher of the Profit Radar Report. The Profit Radar Report presents complex market analysis (S&P 500, Dow Jones, gold, silver, euro and bonds) in an easy format. Technical analysis, sentiment indicators, seasonal patterns and common sense are all wrapped up into two or more easy-to-read weekly updates. All Profit Radar Report recommendations resulted in a 59.51% net gain in 2013.

Follow Simon on Twitter @ iSPYETF or sign up for the FREE iSPYETF Newsletter to get actionable ETF trade ideas delivered for free.

Leading U.S. Sector ETFs Send Mixed Messages

Every bull market is built on the shoulders of strong leading sectors. Things tend to get dicey when the leading sectors start to lag. Here’s a look at three leading sector ETFs and some interesting developments.

Looking at leading or lagging sectors can provide clues about the overall health of a bull market.

This article will look at three leading sectors.

Retail Sector – SPDR S&P Retail ETF

The SPDR S&P Retail ETF (NYSEArca: XRT) soared 42.29% in 2013 and was heading for a strong finish (many thought). Retailers love the holidays (November/December), but the 2013 holiday period wasn’t kind to retailers.

As the XRT chart shows, retailers topped in the last week of November and are threatening to break below green support.

A breakdown around 83.50 and 80 for XRT would spell trouble.

Financial Sector – Financial Select Sector SPDR ETF

The financial sector has been leading the S&P 500 for much of 2013 and confirmed Wednesday’s new S&P 500 high (XLF closed 2013 with a 35.52% gain).

Unlike the S&P 500, the financial select sector SPDR (NYSEArca: XLF) is trading well below its all-time high. In fact, it is bumping against 50% Fibonacci retracement resistance at 22.01.

It will take sustained trade above 22.01 to unlock higher up side targets.

Small Cap Stocks – iShares Russell 2000 ETF

Small cap stocks tend to outperform large cap stocks in December/January, but the iShares Russell 2000 ETF (NYSEArca: IWM) has been on fire almost non-stop, up 38.69% in 2013.

Next notable resistance for IWM is around 119 (2002 Fibonacci projection).

Corresponding resistance for the Russell 2000 Index is at 1,166. Unlike IWM, the Russell 2000 Index is already trading above this resistance.

Summary

It’s said that a fractured market is a sick market. We are certainly seeing some ‘unhealthy’ divergences between the various leading sectors (this doesn’t even take into consideration the most recent Dow Theory divergence).

However, XLF and the Russell 2000 Index are at the verge of overcoming their resistance levels. A strong financial sector and small cap segment could also buoy the S&P 500.

The strong 2013 performance of all three leading sectors begs the question if there’s any ‘gas left’ for 2014. The following articles takes a look at how much up side is left:

Did the Strong 2013 Market Cannibalize 2014?

Simon Maierhofer is the publisher of the Profit Radar Report. The Profit Radar Report presents complex market analysis (stocks, gold, silver, euro and bonds) in an easy format. Technical analysis, sentiment indicators, seasonal patterns and common sense are all wrapped up into two or more easy-to-read weekly updates. All Profit Radar Report recommendations resulted in a 59.51% net gain in 2013.

Follow Simon on Twitter @ iSPYETF or sign up for the FREE iSPYETF Newsletter to get actionable ETF trade ideas delivered for free.

Will Small Caps Lead the Market to All-time Highs?

Market timers often watch small caps for clues about possible trend reversals, but thus far the Russell 2000 Small Cap Index is going strong. Here’s a closer look at seasonality and support/resistance levels for the Russell 2000.

It’s said that major market tops are often preceded by weakness in small cap stocks. This premise makes sense, as small cap stocks are most sensitive to the ebb and flow of liquidity. As a liquidity gauge, small cap indexes like the Russell 2000 could be the canary in the mine.

The truth is in the pudding. Does this theory hold up against the facts? The chart below plots the S&P 500 Index against the Russell 2000. I guess the key point is how you define a “major” market top.

Small cap weakness foreshadowed the 2007 top, but wasn’t obvious at the 2010, 2011, and 2012 highs (at least not on the weekly chart).

What about today? Small caps are going strong and the canary is chirping and frolicking.

The second chart provides a closer look at the Russell 2000 (corresponding ETF: iShares Russell 2000 ETF – IWM).

The Russell 2000 climbed back above the green trend line originating at the October 2011 low.

Recent prior peaks supply various resistance levels (red lines) and today’s decline drove prices below the green November 15 support line (an early warning signal), but starting in mid-December small caps tend to outperform large caps. January is one of the strongest months for small cap stocks.

Historical seasonal patterns suggest that more strength lies ahead for small caps. Technicals support this view. This may drive small caps to new all-time highs (less than 4% away), but I doubt it will be enough to push the Dow and S&P to all-time highs. A break below technical support at 836 (green trend line support) would warn that this year is different.


Simon Maierhofer shares his market analysis and points out high probability, low risk buy/sell recommendations via the Profit Radar Report. Click here for a free trial to Simon’s Profit Radar Report.

Will Small Cap Stocks Catch Up and Trigger a Buy Signal for the S&P 500?

“The stock market is doomed because small cap stocks are trailing behind the S&P” has been the financial media’s message. Obviously the market is doomed eventually, but for now this piece of Wall Street “wisdom” hasn’t paid off. Here’s what the Russell 2000 is telling us.

Small Cap stocks represented by the Russell 2000 and ETFs like the iShares Russell 2000 Index ETF (IWM) have received their fair share of media attention lately.

The focus has been on the under performance of the Russell 2000. This has been considered bearish for the S&P 500 (SPY), Dow Jones (DIA), and Nasdaq (QQQ) since small cap stocks are often viewed as a barometer for the market as a whole.

The Profit Radar Report has been promoting an individual and independant analysis of small caps, financials (XLF) and the Nasdaq to get a better read on the big picture.

Myth Buster

One detailed piece of analysis has shown that under performance by the Russell 2000 is not necessarily negative for the stock market.

There have been nine occasions over the last 20 years where the S&P was within 1% of a multi-month high (1,392 on July 30) while the Russell 2000 was more than 5% below a multi-month high (820 on July 5). This led to small negative returns only three times.

Above Resistance

Even though the whole lagging Russell doom scenario is busted, the Russell broke above key resistance. This happened on August 7, with a close above 800 (a day before XLF broke above resistance at 14.85).

Although the Russell was still lagging the S&P, this break was important and signaled more gains for small caps (financials) and the overall market.

The chart below plots the S&P 500 (SPY) against the Russell 2000 (IWM) and reveals divergences at various degrees.

In May 2011 the Russell 2000 Index recorded an all-time high. The S&P did not. Since then the S&P has nearly reclaimed its 2012 high while the Russell 2000 is about 5% away.

The S&P 500 is about 10% away from its 2007 all-time high, while the Russell 2000 is only 6% away from its 2011 all-time high.

If you are looking for a divergence between the S&P 500 and Russell 2000, you’ll find more than just one, some bullish, some bearish.

The chart below shows immediate resistance for the Russell 2000 and S&P 500 Index (red lines) and short-term support. There are indicators that suggest an upcoming sell off, but as long as prices remain above short-term support (green lines) the trend is up.